May 4 - May 10

Bald Eagle

A Bald Eagle was found south of Baker City on the ground and unable to fly. 

BAEA head.jpg

X-rays taken at Pendleton Veterinary Clinic showed two fractures in the eagle’s right wing.

BAEA Ulna fxs.001.jpg

Dr. Katie Yackley surgically repaired the wing the next day using an approach described by Dr. Pat Redig of the Minnesota Raptor Center that avoids damaging either the wrist or the elbow. The surgery was complicated by the fact that the injury was approximately a week old. The photo below shows the injured wing prepped for surgery. The green color of the skin indicates bruising. 

Wound site prepped.jpg

Dr. Yackley begins the surgery.

Dr. Yackley.jpg

After the surgery, but before the pin is cut.

Wing post surgery.jpg
Post surgery rad.jpg

The proximal bone fragment (closest to the elbow) is not lned up as well as we would have liked, but the bone is stable and hopefully will heal. It looks much better after the wing is bandaged!

BAEA wing bandage.jpg

Hamburger Is Not Bird Food

A misguided (although no doubt well-meaning) person had a nestling Barn Owl for at least three days and fed it hamburger. It took another day to obtain the owl and transport it to Pendleton. The initial exam revealed the owl was emaciated, extremely anemic and very lipemic (lots of fat in the blood from being fed hamburger). It began having seizures shortly after admission due to its extremely calcium deficient condition, also a consequence of its hamburger diet. 

After four days of treatment, the owl is no longer having seizures and it's blood is no longer lipemic. It is still very anemic and critically ill. If the owl makes it through the next week, we will declare victory.

Barn Owl eating.jpg

Follow Up

After several days, the Swainson’s Hawk admitted last week after being electrocuted finally started eating on his own. The wound on his back is looking much better.

SWHA back.jpg




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Location: 71046 Appaloosa Lane, Pendleton, Oregon 97801
Email: lynn@bluemountainwildlife.org
Phone: 541.278.0215


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